Nomenclature



I've been studying these terms for ten minutes now, so if anyone tells me I got anything wrong, well, then, I'll just have to keel haul ya!


Chine: The line of intersection of the bottom with the side of a vee or flat bottomed vessel
Keel(14): Timber at the very bottom of the hull to which frames are attached
Keelson(1): Inner keel bolted to the keel
False Keel(13): A thin strip below the main keel. Used for protection.
Bilge Plank, Bilge Stringer, Bilge Keelson(17): Strengthening plank laid inside of a vessel at the bilge's turn
Bilge Keel(20): Strengthening plank laid outside of a vessel at the bilge's turn
Stringer: Longitudinal plank used as a strengthening member





webmasters notes:
Chine and Bilge+whatever appear to be synonymous.
Although Bilge+whatever seems to imply a rounded curvature between the bottom and sides and the chine implys a sharp angle.

Does this mean you could call those you-know-whats "bilge chine keelson stringer's"?



References:

Pirates, Buccaneers, Privateers & Swashbucklers. Castlebound Enterpises.
NAUTICAL DICTIONARY


INTERNATIONAL THUNDERBIRD CLASS ASSOCIATION
TIPS TO BUILDERS


Department of Transportation
United States Coast Guard
Guidance on Inspection, Repair, and Maintenance of Wooden Hulls


Webster's Third New International Dictionary
Unabridged
© 1993


United States Naval Institute
The Bluejackets' Manual
19th Edition
© 1973




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